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Who determines who we are?

The broad field of femininity/masculinity offers a wealth of fluid identificational references and developmental possibilities if with humour and goodwill we allow our children’s and grandchildren’s generation to undergo the experiences they are seeking.

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Waldorf education on the move in Asia

More than 900 people attended the recent Asian Waldorf Teachers’ Conference in China. Among other things, the conference discussed issues facing Waldorf establishments, including their legal status and cultural adaptation

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Developing Pedagogical Quality – but how?

Thomas Stöckli and his team at the Institute for Action Research in Switzerland have developed a method to develop the educational quality of teaching.

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Putting modern childhood under the spotlight

The International Festival of Childhood, planned for later this year, aims to examine the issues affecting modern childhood. The evidence suggests that there is a massive toll on child health and wellbeing, say the organisers. … >>

New Waldorf World List online

Overall list that includes all Waldorf- and Steiner schools, kindergartens and teacher-training centres for Waldorf educators and Waldorf teachers around the world … >>

The challenge of Waldorf

Being a Waldorf teacher is a challenge which means that Waldorf education in China has found it difficult to retain teachers. … >>

German Waldorf pioneer Stefan Leber dies

Stefan Leber, one of the most important pioneers of the German Waldorf school movement in recent times died yesterday at the age of 78.

Von: NNA
In a statement, the German Waldorf Schools Association (BdFWS) in Stuttgart paid tribute to Leber as someone who had “shaped the Waldorf school movement like no other”. Leber, born in Stuttgart in 1937, was a pupil at the Uhlandshöhe Free Waldorf School. He left school at sixteen to take up an apprenticeship as a process engraver. The simple circumstances of his working class background on the one hand and the encounters with anthroposophists, business people and priests of the Christian Community on the other stayed with him throughout his life, the BdFWS statement adds. These two streams in his life also explained his interest in new models for the world, society and the economy. After his apprenticeship, Leber studied politics, sociology and philosophy in Berlin. There he met many personalities who, like him, were later to exercise a decisive influence on the Waldorf movement, including Manfred von Mackensen and Christoph Gögelein. Studies at the teacher training seminar in Dornach were followed by a teaching post at the Pforzheim Waldorf school from 1962 to 1973. „Lex Waldorf“ During this time Leber became more involved with the BdFWS in Stuttgart, where he joined the council in 1971. In 1973 he moved to Stuttgart with his family to become a lecturer at the teacher training seminar, working with figures such as Ernst-Michael Kranich, Olaf Oltmann and Wolfgang Schad. In the 1970s, Leber together with Günter Altehage and Manfred Leist achieved a breakthrough in education policy in the state of Baden-Württemberg: the so-called “Lex Waldorf” is still in force today and ensures that Waldorf schools have the same status as other schools as “state-approved schools with their own educational model”. Leber wrote more than twenty books on various social themes such as education and the study of the human being, the social form of Waldorf schools, issues related to the state and social order as well as reincarnation and karma. His courses at the teacher training seminar had been “unique” and his lectures and contributions at conference of the Waldorf movement “humourous, anecdotal and open to the world”, the BdFWS statement concludes. END/nna/ung/cva Item: 150219-01EN Date: 19 February 2015 Copyright 2015 News Network Anthroposophy Limited. All rights reserved.

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